- Gary M. Verigin, DDS, inc. - https://biologicaldentalhealth.com -

Quick Links: Omega 3s, B12, Obesity, Drugs in the Water & the Health Benefits of Stress Hardiness

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Linked to Denser Bones in Men [1] (Reuters)

In the study, men who had the highest levels of omega-3s in their blood as 22-year-olds showed the greatest bone mineral density, and also built the most bone between their late teens and their early 20s, Dr. Magnus Hogstrom and colleagues from Umea University in Umea, Sweden found.

Vitamin B12 May Protect the Brain in Old Age [2] (PhysOrg)

The study found that people who had higher vitamin B12 levels were six times less likely to experience brain shrinkage compared with those who had lower levels of the vitamin in their blood. None of the people in the study had vitamin B12 deficiency.

Lessons from the Amish: We’re Not Doomed to Obesity [3] (LA Times)

Four years ago we discovered that the Amish maintained super-low obesity levels despite eating a diet high in fat, calories and refined sugar. They key was their level of physical activity — men averaged 18,000 steps a day, women 14,000. That’s monumental compared to the paltry couple of thousand or so most of us eke out in a day.

A recent study revealed even more about the Old Order Amish: They maintain low obesity levels despite having a gene variation that makes them susceptible to obesity. The secret here? You guessed it — lots of physical activity.

Intellectual Work Induces Excessive Caloric Intake [4] (PhysOrg)

The research team, supervised by Dr. Angelo Tremblay, measured the spontaneous food intake of 14 students after each of three tasks: relaxing in a sitting position, reading and summarizing a text, and completing a series of memory, attention, and vigilance tests on the computer. After 45 minutes at each activity, participants were invited to eat as much as they wanted from a buffet.

The researchers had already shown that each session of intellectual work requires only three calories more than the rest period. However, despite the low energy cost of mental work, the students spontaneously consumed 203 more calories after summarizing a text and 253 more calories after the computer tests. This represents a 23.6% and 29.4 % increase, respectively, compared with the rest period.

Drugs Affect More Drinking Water (AP/PhysOrg)

Testing prompted by an Associated Press story that revealed trace amounts of pharmaceuticals in drinking water supplies has shown that more Americans are affected by the problem than previously thought – at least 46 million.

That’s up from 41 million people reported by the AP in March as part of an investigation into the presence of pharmaceuticals in the nation’s waterways.

The AP stories prompted federal and local legislative hearings, brought about calls for mandatory testing and disclosure, and led officials in at least 27 additional metropolitan areas to analyze their drinking water. Positive tests were reported in 17 cases, including Reno, Nev., Savannah, Ga., Colorado Springs, Colo., and Huntsville, Ala. Results are pending in three others.

Studies Show How Handling Stress Improves Health (Mayo Clinic Stress Blog)

Another fascinating study was discussed at the recent international conference on Alzheimer’s disease in Chicago. Individuals who exercise on a regular basis clearly documented that there was a “significant relationship” between the size of the key areas in the brain connected with memory and fitness. Patients who are more fit had less brain tissue damage and those with lower levels of fitness had more brain damage.

 


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