Fluoride as Distraction

Posted on Wednesday, October 7th, 2015

Some things don’t need a click-baity title to make you sit up and pay attention – such as an argument against fluoride from what appears to be an overall pro-fluoride position. We’ve seen it at least once before, but another recently came on our radar via the Sydney Morning Herald. As a treatment for tooth […]


Sugar: The Difference-Maker

Posted on Tuesday, April 28th, 2015

Recently, we ran across a not-very-surprising-yet-kind-of-interesting study published earlier this year in Caries Research. The “no surprise” part is that it confirmed the role for sucrose – ordinary table sugar – in tooth decay. Evaluating a group of children over the course of 13 years, the researchers found that those with the highest sugar intake […]


Stat!: The Way to Decay

Posted on Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

Percent of Americans who don’t brush their teeth twice a day, as recommended: 40 Percent who, when they do brush, brush less than the recommended 2 minutes: 50+ Percent who never floss at all: 33 Grams of added sugar eaten daily by the average American: 77+ Grams of sugar eaten daily by the top 20% […]


Xylitol: “Not the Silver Bullet”

Posted on Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

Over the past several years, we’ve heard more and more about xylitol as a means of preventing cavities. Does it work? As our regular readers know, the evidence has seemed mixed at best. A new Cochrane review of the research confirms that suspicion. So far, there doesn’t seem to be enough good quality evidence to […]


Whatever Sugar Wants…

Posted on Thursday, March 19th, 2015

When it comes to preventing tooth decay, conventional dentistry typically offers just a couple “solutions” beyond standard oral hygiene: sealants and fluoride. Of course, neither of these addresses the major cause of caries (cavities). As the editor of the British Dental Journal wrote there last summer, It is…intriguing how when one asks a patient what […]


What Did You Expect? (Sugarific Edition)

Posted on Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

Hold onto your hats and glasses, folks! A study just published in the Journal of Dentistry finds that… Wait for it… Wait for it… Wait for it… Sugary drinks cause cavities in adults. And the more you drink, the higher your risk. Following nearly 1000 subjects for four years, the researchers found that those who […]


Is Coffee Really That Bad for Your Teeth?

Posted on Thursday, June 12th, 2014

The coffee that’s supposed to be so horrible for your teeth and gums? It may not be quite that horrible at all. Oh, sure, it can stain the heck out of ’em. And if you like to drink it loaded with sugar, milk, flavored syrup, whipped cream and all that, your teeth will be the […]


Xylitol: Opinion Shifts Again?

Posted on Friday, April 26th, 2013

What were we saying about health news sometimes being a little crazy-making? About a month ago, a new xylitol study found that lozenges made with the stuff might not actually be all that great at reducing tooth decay. This month: But this paper, published in the Journal of Dental Research, is a true follow-up: a […]


“…Tooth Decay Will Generally Be Checked, Provided…”

Posted on Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

When we first wrote about the claim that you can “cure” a cavity with little more than butter oil supplements, we had no idea it would become one of our most read and shared posts ever. Nor did we anticipate the strong feelings it would stir among both those who had similar questions and those […]


Coming Soon: Warning Labels on Soft Drinks?

Posted on Friday, February 15th, 2013

If Big Food thinks the kind of regulation Robert Lustig proposed for sugar is a bit much, perhaps they’d like warning labels on soft drinks instead. A new study published in the American Journal of Public Health suggests sugar-sweetened beverages, particularly soft drinks, energy drinks and sports drinks, should be required to have tooth decay […]



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